Voice of Tourism

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Look around at the workers in this area, one in seven works in tourism. No other industry, next to the government, employs that many people in this market.
 
The tourism economy is big in this area, but made up predominately of small businesses trying to make ends meet. It isn’t always easy.
 
Consulting with tourism partners every day, I hear many concerns. “It’s slower than last year.” “Visitors aren’t spending.” “Taxes are too high.” 
 

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With any art, the artist rarely starts out naturally producing work that’s commercially viable or critically acclaimed. They spend hours practicing, training, and honing their craft.
Customer service is no different. It takes management willing to continually train and staff striving for it every day, even when it doesn’t seem easy.

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Bad customer service.
Just reading those three words you probably have a story that has popped in your head about the time when someone was rude to you at a store or when you decided you would never go back to a place because of the people you encountered behind the counter.
Ask any tourism business in Savannah, from retail to restaurant, and they will tell you how their business can live and die by the customer experience.

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By all accounts, I should be a chemist. It’s what my father did. But, I chose a different path – tourism and hospitality.
A friend of mine asked what my job was, and I replied, “My job is to make people happy.” Tourism is a great career.
In this city, it’s not hard to see how a career in tourism would be a both fun and logical choice. Tourism is everywhere and touches so many other industries.
Recently, I read a post promoting the tourism industry in British Columbia. It was called the “Top 10 reasons why you should choose a career in tourism.”

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Eleven new officers patrol our streets today after a pinning ceremony on July 26.
I was honored to be asked to deliver the keynote address to the new officers, their families, and the other officers who work tirelessly to make our community safer.
It was encouraging to see the tenured officers lining the room as the new officers raised their right hand to make the pledge that will change their lives forever. I was humbled by their service to our community.